Claas Gutsche (born in 1982 in Blankenburg, Germany) studied at the Burg Giebichenstein Hochschule für Kunst und Design Halle from 2003 to 2006 and earned his master’s degree in printmaking from the Royal College of Art in London in 2009. He has exhibited extensively in Germany and abroad. Recent solo exhibitions include Claas Gutsche. Cracks in Concrete (2016) at the Museum Franz Gertsch in in Burgdorf, Switzerland; Constructed Utopia at the Kunstverein virtuell-visuell e.V., Dorsten, Germany (2015); and Changing Truth (2014) and Drama & Romantik (2012), both at Galerie WAGNER + PARTNER, Berlin. His work is in several public collections such as the Deutsche Nationalbibliothek in Leipzig and Frankfurt am Main, the Royal College of Art Print Collection, the New York Public Library, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Gutsche’s work addresses the way architecture influences our memory of a specific time, and the way images, particularly photographs, retrospectively alter these impressions. His latest work explores former East German (GDR) architecture and remains. He often works in linocut because it offers the possibility of creating large formats and the medium produces dramatic compositions of light and shadow that suggest an atmosphere at once threatening and sublime.

Gutsche spent five days in April 2017 working with us on two screenprints at the Print Association Bentlage in Rheine, Germany. The Arrival depicts the view from the artist’s Berlin studio of a building that was formerly part of the Stasi restricted zone during the East German (GDR) era, and now houses Syrian refugees. In the context of an overcast, inhospitable winter evening, the edifice at first seems to beckon the newcomer, but this stark, ominous structure presents a disquieting sanctuary with its chilly glow of institutional lighting. Shift evokes a similar sense of unease. A typical soupy winter night in Berlin is illuminated by three streetlights that cast a harsh and acidic glow on the branches within their reach. The only sign of human life is suggested by the blue light that emanates from a television through three windows. The title Shift conjures up the late, solitary return home of someone working a night shift, as well as the potential shiftiness or treacherousness of the obscure and eerie surroundings.
 

Claas Gutsche
Aspinwall Editions Claas Gutsche Screenprint
The Arrival
2017
Screenprint
Image 18 3/4 x 24 1/2 in. (47.8 x 62 cm), sheet 23 x 28 3/4 in. (58.2 x 71.8 cm)

Edition of 25
Aspinwall Editions Claas Gutsche Screenprint
Shift
2017
Screenprint
Image 23 3/4 x 18 7/8 in. (60.5 x 48 cm), sheet 28 1/2 x 22 7/8 in. (72.5 x 58 cm)

Edition of 20

Aspinwall Editions Claas Gutsche Linocut
Sculpture
2014
Linocut
14 3/4 x 11 7/8 in. (37.5 x 30 cm)

Edition of 10
Aspinwall Editions Claas Gutsche Linocut
Vorgarten
2014
Linocut
26 x 21 in. (66 x 53.5 cm)

Edition of 6

Aspinwall Editions Claas Gutsche Linocut
Die Gestaltung 2
2016
Linocut
20 x 15 3/4 in. (50.7 x 40 cm)

Edition of 10
Aspinwall Editions Claas Gutsche Linocut
Relict (Dusk Version)
2015
Linocut
20 3/4 x 14 1/8 in. (52.7 x 36 cm)

Edition of 5

Aspinwall Editions Claas Gutsche Linocut
Fassade
2014
Linocut
10 1/2 x 8 5/8 in. (26.5 x 22 cm)

Edition of 5
Aspinwall Editions Claas Gutsche Linocut
Die Gestaltung
2014
Linocut
11 1/8 x 17 in. (28.3 x 43 cm)

Edition of 5

Aspinwall Editions Claas Gutsche Linocut
Der Platz
2015
Linocut
22 1/4 x 26 1/2 in. (56.5 x 67.5 cm)

Edition of 10
Aspinwall Editions Claas Gutsche Linocut
Concrete
2014
Linocut
21 1/4 x 27 in. (54 x 68.8 cm)

Edition of 10

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